Tag Archives: sentiment analysis

Sentiment Analysis in Excel: optimizing for your domain

In previous tutorials about Sentiment Analysis and our Excel add-in, we showed you step by step how to carry out a sentiment analysis with an example spreadsheet. In the first tutorial we focused in how to do the analysis, and then we took a look at the global polarity we obtained. In the second tutorial, we showed you how to customize the aspect-based sentiment analysis to detect exactly what you want in a text through the use of user dictionaries.

In this tutorial we are going to show you how to adapt the sentiment analysis to your own subdomain using of our brand new sentiment model customization functionality.

We are going to continue to use the same example as in the previous tutorials, as well as refer to some of the concepts we explain there, so we recommend to check them out beforehand, specially if you are new to our Excel add-in. You can download here the Excel spreadsheet with the data we are going to use.

The data we have been working on are restaurant reviews extracted from Yelp, more specifically reviews on Japanese restaurants in London.

In the last tutorial, we saw that some of the results we obtained could be improved. The issue in these cases was that certain expressions do not have the same polarity when we are talking about food or a restaurant than when we are using them in a general context. A clear example of this is the verb ‘share’. It is generally considered something positive, but in restaurant reviews it’s mostly mentioned when people order food to share, which has little to do with the sentiment expressed in the review.

This is where the sentiment model customization functionality helps us: it allows us to add our own criteria to the sentiment analysis.

Let’s see how to do this!
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Sentiment Analysis in Excel: getting started

Excel spreadsheets are one of the most extended ways of working with big collections of data. They are very powerful and they are very easy to combine and integrate with a myriad of other tools. Through our Excel Add-in we provide you a way of adding MeaningCloud’s analyses to your work pipeline. It’s very simple and it has the added benefit of not needing to write any code to do it.

In this tutorial we are going to show you how to use our Excel Add-in to do sentiment analysis. We are going to do so by analyzing restaurant reviews we’ve extracted from Yelp.

To get started, first you need to register in MeaningCloud (if you haven’t already), and download and install the Excel add-in in your computer. Here you can read a detailed step by step of the process.

Once you’ve installed it, a new tab called MeaningCloud should appear when you open Excel. If you click on it, these are the buttons you will see.

excel add-in ribbon

The first thing you need to do to start using the add-in is to copy your license key and paste it on the corresponding field in the settings menu. You will only have to do this the first time you use the add-in, so if you have already used it, you can skip this step.

Once the license key is saved, you are ready to start analyzing!
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Sentiment Analysis 2.1: Migration guide

We have released a new version of our sentiment analysis API, Sentiment Analysis. In Sentiment Analysis 2.1:

  • We’ve changed how the sentiment model is sent in order to enable the use of custom sentiment models across all the APIs that support sentiment analysis.
  • Support to analyze documents and URLs has been added.
  • A configurable interface language has been added to improve multilingual analyses.

As you would see, this is a minor version upgrade, so the migration process will be fast and painless. In this post, we explain what you need to know to migrate your applications from Sentiment Analysis 2.0 to Sentiment Analysis 2.1.
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Voice of the Customer in the insurance industry

For insurance companies, it is vital to listen and understand the feedback that their current and potential customers express through all kinds of channels and touch points. All this valuable information is known as the Voice of the Customer.  By the way, we had already dedicated a blog post to Text mining in the Insurance industry.

(This post is a based upon the presentation given by Meaning Cloud at the First Congress of Big Data in the Spanish Insurance Industry organized by ICEA. We have embedded our PPT below).  

More and more insurance companies have come to realize that, as achieving product differentiation at the industry is not easy at all, succeeding takes getting satisfied customers.

Listening, understanding and acting on what customers are telling us about their experience with our company is directly related to improving the user experience and, as a result, the profitability. In the post on Voice of the Customer and NPS, we saw in more detail this correlation between customer experience and benefits.

 

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