Text Classification in Excel: build your own model

In the previous tutorial we published about Text Classification and MeaningCloud’s Excel add-in, we showed you step by step how to carry out an automatic text classification using an example spreadsheet.

In this tutorial, we are going a bit further: instead of just using one of the predefined classification models we provide, we are going to create our own model using the model customization console in order to classify according to whichever categories we want.

We are going to work with the same example as before: London restaurants reviews extracted from Yelp. We will use some data from the previous tutorial, but for this one we need more texts, so we’ve added some. You can download the spreadsheet here if you want to follow the tutorial along.

If you followed the previous tutorial, you might remember that we tried to use the IAB model (a predefined model for contextual advertisement) to classify the different restaurant reviews and find out what type of restaurants they were. We had limited success: we did obtain a restaurant type for some of them, but for the rest we just got a general category, “Food & Drink“, which didn’t tell us anything new.

This is where our customization tools come in. Our classification models customization console allows you to create a model with the categories you want and lets you define exactly the criteria to use in the classification.

So how do we create this user model?
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Learn to develop custom text classifiers (recorded webinar)

Last October 5th we presented our webinar “Learn to develop custom text classifiers with MeaningCloud”. Thank you all for your attendance.

We began by presenting how to do text classification with MeaningCloud and why it is necessary to develop models that are adapted to each specific application scenario. The bulk of the presentation consisted in using a practical case (analysis of restaurant reviews) to show how these models can be developed using our product.

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Text Classification in Excel: getting started

As you probably already know, Excel spreadsheets are one of the most extended ways of working with big collections of data. They are powerful and easy to combine and integrate with a myriad of other tools. Through our Excel Add-in, we enable you to add MeaningCloud’s analysis capabilities to your work pipeline. The process is very simple as you do not need to write any code.

In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to use our Excel Add-in to perform text classification. We are going to do so by analyzing restaurant reviews we’ve extracted from Yelp. If you have already read some of our previous tutorials, this first part may sound familiar.

To get started, you need to register in MeaningCloud (if you haven’t already), and download and install the Excel add-in on your computer. Here you can read a detailed step by step guide to the process.

Once you’ve installed it, a new tab called MeaningCloud will appear when you open Excel. If you click on it, you will see the following buttons:

excel add-in ribbon

To start using the add-in, you need to copy your license key and paste it into the corresponding field in the Settings menu. You are required to do this only the first time you use the add-in, so if you have already used it, you can skip this step.

Once the license key is saved, you are ready to start analyzing!
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Learn to develop custom text classifiers with MeaningCloud (webinar)

Learn in this webinar how to use MeaningCloud’s tools to create classification models completely adapted to your scenario

Users frequently ask us through our support line how to perform text classification according to application-specific taxonomies. For example, somebody needing to analyzing a bank’s contact center calls and open survey responses might be interested in classifying such messages according to the institution’s different types of products and services (deposits, loans, mortgages, etc.) or the type of interaction (request for information, contracting, complaint, etc.).

Custom classification

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Automatic IAB tagging enables semantic ad targeting

Our Text Classification API supports IAB’s standard contextual taxonomy, enabling content tagging in compliance with this model in large volumes and with great speed, and easing the participation in the new online advertising ecosystem. The result is the impression of ads in the most appropriate context, with higher performance and brand protection for advertisers.

What is IAB’s contextual classification and what is it good for

The IAB QAG contextual taxonomy was initially developed by the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) as the center of its Quality Assurance Guidelines program, whose aim was to promote the advertised brands’ safety, assuring advertisers that their ads would not appear in a context of inappropriate content. The QAG program provided certification opportunities for all kinds of agents in the digital advertising value chain, from ad networks and exchanges to publishers, supply-side platforms (SSPs), demand-side platforms (DSPs), and agency trading desks (ATDs).

The Quality Assurance Guidelines serve as a self-regulation framework to guarantee advertisers that their brands are safe, enhance the advertisers’ control over the placement and context of their ads, and offers transparency to the marketplace by standardizing the information flowing among agents. All this, by providing a clear, common language that describes the characteristics of the advertising inventory and the transactions across the advertising value chain.

Essentially, the contextual taxonomy serves to tag content and is made of standard Tiers, 1 and 2 – specifying, respectively, the general category of the content and a set of subcategories nested under this main category – and a third Tier (or more) that can be defined by each organization. The following pictures represent those standard tiers.
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Join MeaningCloud at the 2016 Sentiment Analysis Symposium

Banner Sentiment Analysis SymposiumMeaningCloud is excited to be sponsoring the 2016 Sentiment Analysis Symposium, taking place July 12 in New York. Join us there!

The Symposium is the first and best conference to address the business value of sentiment, opinion, and emotion in social, online, and enterprise data. The audience is comprised of business analysts, developers, data scientists, and researchers, applying text, sentiment, and social analytics to a host of business challenges. And the speakers? They represent users like Johnson & Johnson, the Mayo Clinic, and VML, analysts like Forrester Research, and innovative start-ups and established technology players.

We will present MeaningCloud’s text and sentiment analysis technology during the symposium program, and you can meet us for a personalized demo in the SAS16 exhibit area or for an informal chat during symposium networking breaks.

If you’re up for a deep technical introduction, start your Symposium experience with an optional half-day tutorial — Computing Sentiment, Emotion, and Personality — taught July 11.

There’s good reason the Symposium has been going strong since 2010. Come network and learn with some of the best sentiment and social data innovators around. Use the registration code MEANING to save 20% on your ticket — register online here — and we’ll see you in New York!


Sentiment Analysis in Excel: optimizing for your domain

In previous tutorials about Sentiment Analysis and our Excel add-in, we showed you step by step how to carry out a sentiment analysis with an example spreadsheet. In the first tutorial we focused in how to do the analysis, and then we took a look at the global polarity we obtained. In the second tutorial, we showed you how to customize the aspect-based sentiment analysis to detect exactly what you want in a text through the use of user dictionaries.

In this tutorial we are going to show you how to adapt the sentiment analysis to your own subdomain using of our brand new sentiment model customization functionality.

We are going to continue to use the same example as in the previous tutorials, as well as refer to some of the concepts we explain there, so we recommend to check them out beforehand, specially if you are new to our Excel add-in. You can download here the Excel spreadsheet with the data we are going to use.

The data we have been working on are restaurant reviews extracted from Yelp, more specifically reviews on Japanese restaurants in London.

In the last tutorial, we saw that some of the results we obtained could be improved. The issue in these cases was that certain expressions do not have the same polarity when we are talking about food or a restaurant than when we are using them in a general context. A clear example of this is the verb ‘share’. It is generally considered something positive, but in restaurant reviews it’s mostly mentioned when people order food to share, which has little to do with the sentiment expressed in the review.

This is where the sentiment model customization functionality helps us: it allows us to add our own criteria to the sentiment analysis.

Let’s see how to do this!
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Sentiment Analysis in Excel: customizing aspect-based analyses

In the previous tutorial we published about Sentiment Analysis and MeaningCloud’s Excel add-in, we showed you step by step how to do a sentiment analysis using an example spreadsheet. Then we showed you a possible analysis you could obtain with its global polarity results.

In this tutorial we are going a bit further: instead of analyzing the global polarity obtained for different texts, we are going to focus on the analysis of different aspects that appear in them and how to use our dictionaries customization console to improve them and to extract easily the exact information you are interested in.

We are going to work withe same example as before: reviews for Japanese restaurants in London extracted from Yelp. If you don’t have it already from the previous tutorial, you can download the spreadsheet with the data here.

If you followed the previous tutorial, you will remember that when you run the sentiment analysis without changing its default settings, two new sheets appear: Global Sentiment Analysis and Topics Sentiment Analysis. Topics Sentiment Analysis shows you the concepts and entities detected in each one of the texts and the sentiment analysis associated to each one of them.

But what can we do when these are not the aspects of the text we are interested in analyzing? This is where our customization tools come in. Our dictionaries customization console allows you to create a dictionary with any of the concepts or entities you want to detect in your analysis, down the type you want them to have associated.

So how do we create this user dictionary?
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A tailored sentiment analysis (recorded webinar)

Last May 4th we presented our webinar “An entirely tailored sentiment analysis using MeaningCloud”. Thank you all for your attendance.

After a brief introduction to MeaningCloud and the operation of its add-in for Excel, we developed a practical example of sentiment analysis in a specific domain (restaurant reviews) and showed how MeaningCloud’s customization tools can be used to improve the accuracy of the analysis:

  • By including attributes that are relevant to the domain and focusing the analysis around them, through the creation of personal dictionaries of entities and concepts.
  • By specifying the polarity of expressions in the domain depending on the context, thanks to the definition of personal sentiment models.

Together, these tools enable our users to be greatly autonomous in the customization of MeaningCloud and put the highest-quality sentiment analysis at everybody’s fingertips.

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Sentiment Analysis in Excel: getting started

Excel spreadsheets are one of the most extended ways of working with big collections of data. They are very powerful and they are very easy to combine and integrate with a myriad of other tools. Through our Excel Add-in we provide you a way of adding MeaningCloud’s analyses to your work pipeline. It’s very simple and it has the added benefit of not needing to write any code to do it.

In this tutorial we are going to show you how to use our Excel Add-in to do sentiment analysis. We are going to do so by analyzing restaurant reviews we’ve extracted from Yelp.

To get started, first you need to register in MeaningCloud (if you haven’t already), and download and install the Excel add-in in your computer. Here you can read a detailed step by step of the process.

Once you’ve installed it, a new tab called MeaningCloud should appear when you open Excel. If you click on it, these are the buttons you will see.

excel add-in ribbon

The first thing you need to do to start using the add-in is to copy your license key and paste it on the corresponding field in the settings menu. You will only have to do this the first time you use the add-in, so if you have already used it, you can skip this step.

Once the license key is saved, you are ready to start analyzing!
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