Category Archives: Tutorials

Posts about Meaningcloud’s tutorials.

Voice of the Employee Dashboard

Voice of the Employee gathers the needs, wishes, hopes, and preferences of all employees within an organization. The VoE takes into account both explicit needs, such as salaries, career, health, and retirement, as well as tacit needs such as job satisfaction and the respect of co-workers and supervisors. This post follows the line of Voice of the Customer in Excel: creating a dashboard. We are creating another dashboard, this time for the Voice of the Employee.

Text-based data sources are a key factor for any organization that wants to understand the “whys”.

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Voice of the Customer in Excel: creating a dashboard

Excel spreadsheets are still one of the most extended ways of working with big collections of data, especially among non-technical users. Two of our Vertical Packs, Voice of the Customer and Voice of the Employee, are particularly useful for typically non-technical teams, which can now carry out their analyses easily with our last Excel integration.

In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to use the add-in provided in the Voice of the Customer Vertical Pack, how to carry out a VoC analysis, and how to work with its output by creating a dashboard like the one on the right. Working with the Voice of the Employee Pack would follow a similar pattern.

A practical case

Let us imagine we work for a market research department or agency interested in analyzing the Insurance industry. Customer comments in forums and social networks constitute an extremely valuable source of spontaneous information about their opinions about insurance providers.

Dashboard

We are going to focus specifically on auto insurance reviews extracted from ConsumerAffairs, a website that collects reviews from several domains.

The reviews we are going to use have been extracted from the top five companies in the Auto Insurance section: for each one of them we’ve picked ten items. You can download here the Excel spreadsheet we will be working on. It contains a single sheet where we have included two columns: one with the selected reviews, and another with the name of the company they refer to.

As we have mentioned, for this tutorial we are going to use our Vertical Pack for Voice of the Customer analysis. Vertical Packs are a combination of preconfigured models or dictionaries, powerful APIs and specific add-ins for Excel that enable you to adapt text analytics to your domain with only one click. Just by registering at MeaningCloud, you have a 30-day trial for all Vertical Packs available. The trial starts the moment you first analyze a text, so users that have been using MeaningCloud for a while will also be able to try it out.

To get started, you need to register at MeaningCloud (if you haven’t already) and download and install the VoC Excel add-in on your computer. Here you can read a detailed step by step guide to the process.

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RapidMiner: Impact of topics on the sentiment of textual product reviews

This is the second of two tutorials where we will be using MeaningCloud Extension for RapidMiner to extract insights that combine structured data with unstructured text. Read the first one here. To follow these tutorials you will need to have RapidMiner Studio and our Extension for RapidMiner installed on your machine (learn how here).

In this RapidMiner tutorial we shall attempt to extract a rule set that will predict the positivity/negativity of a review based on MeaningCloud’s topics extraction feature as well as sentiment analysis.

To be more specific, we will try to give an answer to the following question:

  • Which topics have the most impact in a customer review and how do they affect the sentiment of the review that the user has provided?

For this purpose, we will use a dataset of food reviews that comes from Amazon. The dataset can be found here.

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RapidMiner: Relationship between product scores and text review sentiment

This is the first of two tutorials where we will be using MeaningCloud Extension for RapidMiner to extract insights that combine structured data with unstructured text. See the second one here. To follow these tutorials you will need to have RapidMiner Studio and our Extension for RapidMiner installed on your machine (learn how here).

In this tutorial we shall analyze a set of food reviews from Amazon. We will use the MeaningCloud sentiment API and try to see how users score products and whether their review description of a certain product corresponds to the score that they have assigned – more specifically we will try to see

  • How closely the review sentiment corresponds to the manually assigned score (which we already have available in our dataset).

The dataset that we will be using throughout the tutorial can be found here. First thing we need to do is download the CSV to our computer.

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Text Analytics & MeaningCloud 101

One of the questions we get most often at our helpdesk is how to apply the text analytics functionalities that MeaningCloud provides to specific scenarios.

Users know they want to incorporate text analytics into their processes but are not sure how to translate their business requirements into something they can integrate into their pipeline.

If you add the fact that each provider has a different name for the products they offer to carry out specific text analytics tasks, it becomes difficult not just to get started, but even to know exactly what you need for your scenario.

homer-simpson-confused

In this post, we are going to explain what our different products are used for, the NLP (Natural Language Processing) tasks they are tied to, the added value they provide, and the requirements they fulfill.

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Text Classification in Excel: build your own model

In the previous tutorial we published about Text Classification and MeaningCloud’s Excel add-in, we showed you step by step how to carry out an automatic text classification using an example spreadsheet.

In this tutorial, we are going a bit further: instead of just using one of the predefined classification models we provide, we are going to create our own model using the model customization console in order to classify according to whichever categories we want.

We are going to work with the same example as before: London restaurants reviews extracted from Yelp. We will use some data from the previous tutorial, but for this one we need more texts, so we’ve added some. You can download the spreadsheet here if you want to follow the tutorial along.

If you followed the previous tutorial, you might remember that we tried to use the IAB model (a predefined model for contextual advertisement) to classify the different restaurant reviews and find out what type of restaurants they were. We had limited success: we did obtain a restaurant type for some of them, but for the rest we just got a general category, “Food & Drink“, which didn’t tell us anything new.

This is where our customization tools come in. Our classification models customization console allows you to create a model with the categories you want and lets you define exactly the criteria to use in the classification.

So how do we create this user model?
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Text Classification in Excel: getting started

As you probably already know, Excel spreadsheets are one of the most extended ways of working with big collections of data. They are powerful and easy to combine and integrate with a myriad of other tools. Through our Excel Add-in, we enable you to add MeaningCloud’s analysis capabilities to your work pipeline. The process is very simple as you do not need to write any code.

In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to use our Excel Add-in to perform text classification. We are going to do so by analyzing restaurant reviews we’ve extracted from Yelp. If you have already read some of our previous tutorials, this first part may sound familiar.

To get started, you need to register in MeaningCloud (if you haven’t already), and download and install the Excel add-in on your computer. Here you can read a detailed step by step guide to the process.

Once you’ve installed it, a new tab called MeaningCloud will appear when you open Excel. If you click on it, you will see the following buttons:

excel add-in ribbon

To start using the add-in, you need to copy your license key and paste it into the corresponding field in the Settings menu. You are required to do this only the first time you use the add-in, so if you have already used it, you can skip this step.

Once the license key is saved, you are ready to start analyzing!
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Sentiment Analysis in Excel: optimizing for your domain

In previous tutorials about Sentiment Analysis and our Excel add-in, we showed you step by step how to carry out a sentiment analysis with an example spreadsheet. In the first tutorial we focused in how to do the analysis, and then we took a look at the global polarity we obtained. In the second tutorial, we showed you how to customize the aspect-based sentiment analysis to detect exactly what you want in a text through the use of user dictionaries.

In this tutorial we are going to show you how to adapt the sentiment analysis to your own subdomain using of our brand new sentiment model customization functionality.

We are going to continue to use the same example as in the previous tutorials, as well as refer to some of the concepts we explain there, so we recommend to check them out beforehand, specially if you are new to our Excel add-in. You can download here the Excel spreadsheet with the data we are going to use.

The data we have been working on are restaurant reviews extracted from Yelp, more specifically reviews on Japanese restaurants in London.

In the last tutorial, we saw that some of the results we obtained could be improved. The issue in these cases was that certain expressions do not have the same polarity when we are talking about food or a restaurant than when we are using them in a general context. A clear example of this is the verb ‘share’. It is generally considered something positive, but in restaurant reviews it’s mostly mentioned when people order food to share, which has little to do with the sentiment expressed in the review.

This is where the sentiment model customization functionality helps us: it allows us to add our own criteria to the sentiment analysis.

Let’s see how to do this!
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Sentiment Analysis in Excel: customizing aspect-based analyses

In the previous tutorial we published about Sentiment Analysis and MeaningCloud’s Excel add-in, we showed you step by step how to do a sentiment analysis using an example spreadsheet. Then we showed you a possible analysis you could obtain with its global polarity results.

In this tutorial we are going a bit further: instead of analyzing the global polarity obtained for different texts, we are going to focus on the analysis of different aspects that appear in them and how to use our dictionaries customization console to improve them and to extract easily the exact information you are interested in.

We are going to work withe same example as before: reviews for Japanese restaurants in London extracted from Yelp. If you don’t have it already from the previous tutorial, you can download the spreadsheet with the data here.

If you followed the previous tutorial, you will remember that when you run the sentiment analysis without changing its default settings, two new sheets appear: Global Sentiment Analysis and Topics Sentiment Analysis. Topics Sentiment Analysis shows you the concepts and entities detected in each one of the texts and the sentiment analysis associated to each one of them.

But what can we do when these are not the aspects of the text we are interested in analyzing? This is where our customization tools come in. Our dictionaries customization console allows you to create a dictionary with any of the concepts or entities you want to detect in your analysis, down the type you want them to have associated.

So how do we create this user dictionary?
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Sentiment Analysis in Excel: getting started

Excel spreadsheets are one of the most extended ways of working with big collections of data. They are very powerful and they are very easy to combine and integrate with a myriad of other tools. Through our Excel Add-in we provide you a way of adding MeaningCloud’s analyses to your work pipeline. It’s very simple and it has the added benefit of not needing to write any code to do it.

In this tutorial we are going to show you how to use our Excel Add-in to do sentiment analysis. We are going to do so by analyzing restaurant reviews we’ve extracted from Yelp.

To get started, first you need to register in MeaningCloud (if you haven’t already), and download and install the Excel add-in in your computer. Here you can read a detailed step by step of the process.

Once you’ve installed it, a new tab called MeaningCloud should appear when you open Excel. If you click on it, these are the buttons you will see.

excel add-in ribbon

The first thing you need to do to start using the add-in is to copy your license key and paste it on the corresponding field in the settings menu. You will only have to do this the first time you use the add-in, so if you have already used it, you can skip this step.

Once the license key is saved, you are ready to start analyzing!
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